Women Faculty Book Club

ImageThe Women Faculty Book Club at FIU, like so many others, meets to affirm our membership in a community of book lovers. With each work we discuss, we deepen our shared experience, learn more about each other and ourselves, and honor the heritage of women’s creativity across eras and cultures.

For more information about joining the book club, please contact Joyce Peterson at petersoj@fiu.edu.

Please feel free to click on the "Our Books" tab on the left where you will find a comprehensive listing of our reading selections going back to 1991 along with links to our three published editions of the club's bookmarks. These publications encompass our chosen record of women’s writing from the last twenty-five years. We hope you find it a useful guide to leisure reading.

Please find below a listing of the AY 2016-17 Book Club books.

The schedule for our next 2017 spring semester meetings is as follows:

April 23, 2017

Our final Book Club meeting for this academic year will be held on Sunday, April 23, 7:00 pm at the home of Yesim Darici.

The book selection is The Joys of Motherhood by Buchi Emecheta. Emecheta died recently and I have attached one of her obituaries to provide some information about her. Buchi Emecheta, NYT Obituary

Our April 23 meeting will be our traditional pot-luck supper at the home of Yesim Darici. Yesim has hosted this event for quite a few years now and it is always a wonderful gathering. We hope to see many of you on April 23 at 7:00 pm where we will also discuss our summer reading plans. The summer theme will be historical fiction. I will send out another reminder closer to the date of the event, but please be sure to mark your calendars now.

March 2017

The next meeting will be held on Sunday, March 19, at Judith Stiehm's house.

In honor of Women's History Month our book selection for March is Flaneuse: Women Walk the City in Paris, New York, Tokyo, Venice and London by Lauren Elkin. It is available for pre-order from Amazon now and will be released on February 28. Flaneuse discusses the experience of women, urban walkers. Reviewer Lucy Scholes imagines Lauren Elkin "as an intrepid feminist graffiti artist, scrawling 'Woman woz here' on every wall she passes. Deliciously spiky and seditious, she takes her readers on a rich, intelligent and lively meander through cultural history, biography, literary criticism, urban topography and memoir..."

For more information on Flaneuse: Women Walk the City in Paris, New York, Tokyo, Venice and London click here.

February 2017

Our book for February will be Ann Patchett's Commonwealth. New York Times reviewer Jennifer Senior called Commonwealth "Ann Patchett's exquisite new novel" and suggests that the novel raises counterfactual, philosophical questions: "Who might we be if our parents hadn't made catastrophic choices, and we hadn't responded catastrophically to them?"

For more information on Commonwealth click here.

January 2017

There will be two books to read for January Zadie Smith's Swing Time and Susan Crandall's Whistling Past the Graveyard. Swing Time covers a quarter century (ending in 2008) in the life of two women who first become friends as children when they form an alliance as the only brown girls in their dance class. Smith "captures the delicate intersections of class and race", explores everyday life in London and Africa, and takes us into the world of pop music and dance.

For more information on Swing Time click here.

For more information on Whistling Past the Graveyard click here.

November 2016

Our choice for November is Elizabeth Gilbert's The Signature of All Things, a novel about "a botanist whose hunger for explanations carries her through the better part of Darwin's century." New York Times book reviewer Barbara Kingsolver calls this novel "a bracing homage to the many natures of genius and the inevitable progress of ideas in a world that reveals its best truths to the uncommonly patient minds."

For more information on The Signature of All Things click here.

October 2016

We have selected The Little Red Chairs by Irish writer Edna O'Brien. O'Brien's novel has been described as "boldly imagined and harrowing" and explores the themes of "Irish provincial life from the perspective of girls and women" and provides "an alternate history in which the devastation of a war-town Central European country intrudes upon the 'primal innocence' ...of rural Ireland." It asks fundamental questions about the meaning of innocence and of complicity with evil. Here is a link to the review by Joyce Carol Oates that appeared in The New York Times on March 28, 2016.

For more information on The Little Red Chairs, click here.

September 2016

See the list of short story collections that we chose as our summer reading. Feel free to read as much or as little as you like, across writers, or within a single one. All of these collections were very favorably reviewed over the past year.

Feel free to bring along to the September meeting anyone interested in joining our group. Newcomers are always welcome.