Spring 2012

Spring 2012 List of Approved Courses

*Courses are subject to change based on enrollment

Official Registration Week: November 7 - 20
Open Registration Week: November 21 - January 8

Spring begins: January 9
Spring ends: April 28

MODESTO MAIDIQUE CAMPUS (MMC)

WST 3015 U02-C | 15170 | Intro to Women’s Studies | Johnson | MoWe 2:00-3:15pm
WST 3015 U01-C | 18240 | Intro to Women's Studies | Johnson | MoWe 5:00-6:15pm
This course is designed to introduce students to women's studies as an interdisciplinary field of knowledge. The purpose of the course is to involve students in the on-going dialogue of women's experiences and women's socialization by sex, class, color, and culture, as well as the economics of discrimination. The course will assist students in clarifying the many misconceptions surrounding the discipline and the myths and realities regarding women's status in society. Topics of discussion include: Connections between women’s studies and feminism; questions of identity and socialization process in determining gender roles; diversity: class, race, ethnicity, age, and sexual orientation; religion and the status of women in societies; our bodies, ourselves; women and work; women and education. Some of the questions addressed in women’s studies include: Why study women? Are women powerless or powerful? Why are racism, heterosexism, ageism, and class exploitation considered to be women’s studies issues? How can feminist thought be used in transformative ways?

WST 3105 U01-C | 18255 | Gender Issues Across the Globe | Moura-Kocoglu | TuTh 11:00am - 12:15 pm
What is a gender issue? Who gets to define what counts as a gender issue—especially across diverse cultures and contexts? This class is an introduction to ‘gender issues’ across the globe, as defined especially by women’s groups, across multiple cultural locations and contexts. The overall aim is to think critically about our own understandings of what these issues are, what kinds of assumptions we might make that shape our understandings, and to hopefully expand those understandings, based on paying attention to and learning from the voices of local groups. In this spirit, we will talk about gender issues that you might expect to talk about, such as violence against women or access to reproductive care. However, we may not always do this in the expected ways. For example, bigger questions here include questions like: How do we define violence against women or reproductive care? What are the parameters of these issues? How do global or transnational forces shape these so-called ‘local’ issues? Beyond these conversations, we will also talk about issues that we may not typically think of as ‘women’s or ‘gender’ issues, such as access to clean water and environmental degradation, food security, war, and economic inequality.

WST 3641 U01-C | 14500 | Gay and Lesbian Across Societies | Loynaz | MW 6:25 – 7:40pm
This course provides an interdisciplinary introduction to gay and lesbian studies by examining the complex issues and debates in American society regarding sexual orientation. An examination of both historical antecedents and the contemporary gay rights movement will include such topics as religion, lifestyles, legal and political issues, and influences on arts and literature.

WST 4504 U01-C | 15149 | Feminist Theory | Patil | T Th 5:00 - 6:15pm
WST 5507 U01-C | 15152
Feminist Theory and Methods is designed to enhance your ability to think critically about women, gender, difference, power, oppression, inequality, institutions, social change, and feminist scholarship. This course will improve your ability to articulate and critique feminist ideas while expanding your understanding of debates in second wave and contemporary feminist thought. This class will also explore the connection of theory and research methods in contemporary feminist scholarship.

WST 4905 U01-Z | 15144 | WS Independent Study | Darici | TBA
WST 5905 U01-Z | 15145
Supervised readings course designed for advanced students who wish to pursue specialized topics in women’s studies. Arrangements must be made with faculty member during prior semester. Prerequisite: Permission of Interim Women’s Studies Director, Dr. Yesim Darici. Email: dariciy@fiu.edu for more information.

WST 4940 U01-I | 15153 | Women’s Studies Internship | Darici | TBA
This course is available only to students who have taken three Women's Studies courses. Internship sites are arranged on a case by case basis. Students may propose a site or select from sites already established. Most sites are off-campus. See website for guidelines and forms under our “Academics” link: http:/casgroup.fiu.eduwstudies/

APPROVED ELECTIVES

AFA 6217 | 16674 | Sex, Race, & Power in European Colonies | Rahier | M 5:00 – 7:40pm
SYD 6796 | 17423
Critical examination of sexual intimacy in colonial contexts between European colonizers and colonized people. An exploration of the intersection between racialization and sexualization. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

AML 3415 | 17849 | American Literature and the Tradition of Dissent: Rehearsing Feminism| Hoder-Salmon | T Th 5:00 - 6:15pm
Full course title: American Literature and the Tradition of Dissent: Rehearsing Feminism. “Dissent,” as we will examine the idea of dissent in this course, is an ever-present social construct in regard to class, race and gender inequities. The books we will study by women authors writing from the 1880s to 1915 encompass a particular period that ranges from the Civil-War era to the first decade of the 20th century. During this era American women’s activism began to exert influence, thereby altering society as women gained public and private rights. Our writers engage dissent both on the domestic stage and the world beyond home; in both settings women’s rebellion takes the form of subtle, but no less daring dissent. Prerequisites of ENC 1101 and ENC 1102.

AML 4607 | 15797 | 20th Cent. African American Literature | Russell | W 6:25 – 9:05pm
This course examines 20th century African American Literature within its relevant social, historical, political and cultural contexts. African American Literature will examine the unfolding and development of the African American literary tradition –a tradition that is constituted by what literary critic Hortense Spillers describes as a matrix of “cross-currents and discontinuities.” Additionally, the course will foreground the intersections of race, gender and class as mutually interlocking categories of analysis. Though not intending to be comprehensive the course will examine the central markers that frame 20th century African American Literature: Harlem Renaissance, Black Arts Movement, Civil Rights Movement, Black Feminist movement and New Black Aesthetics. Prerequisites of ENC 1101 and ENC 1102.

CCJ 3666 | 15612 | Victimology | Vincent Robinson | W 11:00am – 1:40pm
A comprehensive study of victimization, including the relationship between the victims and offenders, and their interaction with the criminal justice system. Considerable amount of time discussing victims of spousal and sexual abuse.

CCJ 4663 | 17147 | Women, Crime & Crim. Justice | Vincent Robinson | MW 2:00 - 4:40pm
Women as deviants, criminals, victims, and professionals in the criminal justice system.

ENG 4043 | 15836 | Contemporary Lit Theory | Blevens | T 2:00-3:15pm
An examination of the works of recent literary theorists. Prerequisites: ENC 1101 and ENC 1102.

ENG 5048 | 15799 | Literary Theory | Blevens | Th 6:25-9:05pm
An introduction to issues in the nature of literature, the philosophy of criticism, and methods of interpretation. The theoretical foundations for literary study. Prerequisites: Admission to the graduate program in English or by permission of the instructor.

FRW 4583 | 16893 | Women Writers in French | Becel | W 12:00 - 2:50PM
Drawing on the writings of women authors in French, this course explores topics such as: the effects of narrative techniques on subject formation, the poetics of silence and of revolt, sexual difference versus cultural difference. Prerequisites: FRE 3420 or FRE 3421 or permission of the instructor.

GEO 5414 | 17208 | Comparative Feminisms | Faria | W 5:00 - 7:40pm
This course will provide an overview of the key methodological and theoretical contributions of feminism to social theory over the last 50 years with an intellectual focus on feminist theory in Geography, Sociology and Anthropology. This will include the debates from within socialist and Marxist feminism, liberal and neoliberal feminisms, and postcolonial, critical race and transnational feminisms.

LAS 6934 | 18729 | Research Seminar in Latin American and Caribbean Studies | Bidegain | Th 9:00-11:30am
Introduces students to intermediate level research methods while they complete a directed research project in Latin American and Caribbean studies. Prerequisites: LAS 6930 or equivalent.

LBS 4154 | 18573 | Workers & Diversity | Addy | DYNAMIC MINI SEMINAR
LBS 5215 | 15674 | Workplace Diversity
CLASS MEETS: 1/28, 2/25-26, 3/24-45. Sa Su 8:30AM - 5:00PM
The theoretical debates surrounding the workforce participation of women and minorities as well as the historical position of these groups in the labor force are studied. Students explore social phenomena that contribute to the continuation of discriminatory practices and study and analyze the policies that attempt to address these issues. THIS COURSE CARRIES A FLAT FEE LISTED AS LABOR STUDIES.

POS 4072 | 15328 | Women in Politics | Depalo | T Th 12:30 – 1:45pm
Examines the role of women in the political system as they act within, and are affected by, politics. Special attention to current and enduring political issues which particularly affect women.

POS 4605 | 19792 | Gender Justice | Smith | MoWe 3:00-4:15pm
The development of gender law in the U.S. and legal strategies by which courts both initiate and respond to demands for social change. Emphasis on various legal definitions of justice and equality.

REL 3145 | 15155 | Women & Religion | Rowan | MWF 12:00 - 12:50pm
Women and Religion is divided into three parts; the first examines the new archeological findings on neolithic goddess religion, the second examines the roles of women in contemporary religions of the world, and the third surveys ecological activities by women's religious movements

REL 3593 | 15293 | Women & the Early Church | McDaniel | MWF 10:00 – 10:50am
This course will survey the construction of gender and roles of women in the Hebrew Bible, New Testament and early Christian communities. The course will utilize Feminist Reconstruction methodology by examining the historical, cultural and religious settings of the texts, including their subsequent transmission through Western Civilization into the present.

REL 4105/REL5106 | 18477 | Latino/a Immigration and Religion | Bidegain | Th 5:00-7:40pm
The course will analyze the main ways in which the complex phenomenon of migration overlaps with religion focusing on Latino/a immigration to the United States taking into account a gender perspective.

REL 4937 | 18485 | Special Topics: Religion & Queer Theory | Bauman | MWF 1:00 - 1:50pm
The growing field known as “Queer Theory” focuses on destabilizing essential identity construction and foundational knowledge claims. Such essences and foundations are often housed in religious beliefs. At first glance it seems that thinkers such as Michel Foucault and Judith Butler would be nothing but inimical to the study, much less the practice, of religion. However, many scholars have begun incorporating queer theory as a fruitful lens through which to analyze religion over the past couple of decades. Furthermore, queer theory places an emphasis on the historical construction of religious ideas, values, and beliefs and their effects on human identities, bodies and the rest of the natural world. This course will explore the growing scholarship in queer theory that intersects with religious studies. Furthermore and as a result of this scholarship, there is a growing understanding of the history of “queer” identities within religious institutions and texts. The second component of the course will examine some of these queer histories. Finally, such theoretical and historical examination can be helpful in examining contemporary issues of GLBTQ identity and religion, such as understandings of family, marriage, and GLBTQ clergy. In the last section of the course some of these contemporary issues will be explored.

SOP 3742 | 15935 | Psychology of Women | Cigales | T Th 9:30 – 10:45am
This course offers an overview of psychological theory and research relevant to women in contemporary society. General issues to be considered include the historical treatment of women in psychology, psychoanalytical, socio-biological, social-psychological, and developmental perspectives on the behavior of women and men. In addition, specific topics such as female sexuality, psychopathology, and sex differences in nonverbal behavior will be covered.

BISCAYNE BAY CAMPUS (BBC)

WST 3015 B51-C | 18251 | Intro to Women’s Studies | Johnson | T Th 5:00 - 6:15pm
This course is designed to introduce students to women's studies as an interdisciplinary field of knowledge. The purpose of the course is to involve students in the on-going dialogue of women's experiences and women's socialization by sex, class, color, and culture, as well as the economics of discrimination. The course will assist students in clarifying the many misconceptions surrounding the discipline and the myths and realities regarding women's status in society. Topics of discussion include: Connections between women’s studies and feminism; questions of identity and socialization process in determining gender roles; diversity: class, race, ethnicity, age, and sexual orientation; religion and the status of women in societies; our bodies, ourselves; women and work; women and education. Some of the questions addressed in women’s studies include: Why study women? Are women powerless or powerful? Why are racism, heterosexism, ageism, and class exploitation considered to be women’s studies issues? How can feminist thought be used in transformative ways?

WST 3641 B51-C | 15210 | Gay & Lesbian across Societies | | T Th 6:25 - 7:40pm
This course provides an interdisciplinary introduction to gay and lesbian studies by examining the complex issues and debates in American society regarding sexual orientation. An examination of both historical antecedents and the contemporary gay rights movement will include such topics as religion, lifestyles, legal and political issues, and influences on arts and literature.

APPROVED ELECTIVES

ANT 3302 | 17233 | Anthropology of Sex & Gender | Gladwin | T 5:00 - 7:40pm
Cross-cultural ethnographic data will be utilized to examine the enculturation of sex roles, attitudes, and behavior; cultural definitions of maleness and femaleness; and varieties of human sexual awareness and response.

HIS 4311 B51-C | 18531 | History of Feminist Thought | Peterson | T Th 9:30 – 10:45am
American and European thinking about women's rights and identities from the Enlightenment to the present. Includes intellectual and cultural approaches as well as movements for women's rights. Selected thinkers include Mary Wollstonecraft, Margaret Fuller, Charlotte Perkins Gilman, and Simone deBeauvoir.

LIT 4536 | 17719 | Working Class Women’s Literature | Weir | T Th 2:00 – 3:15pm
Does racialized discourses subsume class and/or gender issues or are they inextricably linked? Using a comparative approach, this course will examine issues of class, race and gender in contemporary Women’s fiction. Emphasis will be placed on popular representations of working class women and men across racial lines, and representations of race, class and gender in the literature written by both American and immigrant women.

SOP 4731 | 18882 | Global Psychology | Stephens | TuTh 12:30-1:45pm

ONLINE COURSES

WST 3015 RVC-C | 14687 | Intro to Women’s Studies | Kai
This course is designed to introduce students to women's studies as an interdisciplinary field of knowledge. The purpose of the course is to involve students in the on-going dialogue of women's experiences and women's socialization by sex, class, color, and culture, as well as the economics of discrimination. The course will assist students in clarifying the many misconceptions surrounding the discipline and the myths and realities regarding women's status in society. Topics of discussion include: Connections between women’s studies and feminism; questions of identity and socialization process in determining gender roles; diversity: class, race, ethnicity, age, and sexual orientation; religion and the status of women in societies; our bodies, ourselves; women and work; women and education. Some of the questions addressed in women’s studies include: Why study women? Are women powerless or powerful? Why are racism, heterosexism, ageism, and class exploitation considered to be women’s studies issues? How can feminist thought be used in transformative ways?

WST 3641 RVC-C | 15518 | Gay and Lesbian across Societies | Eaves
This course provides an interdisciplinary introduction to gay and lesbian studies by examining the complex issues and debates in American society regarding sexual orientation. An examination of both historical antecedents and the contemporary gay rights movement will include such topics as religion, lifestyles, legal and political issues, and influences on arts and literature.

APPROVED ELECTIVES

AFA 4372 | 19222 | Race, Gender & Sex in Hip Hop | Stephens
This course aims to re-structure stereotypes and offer deeper perspectives into the ways mainstream Hip Hop can inform/ reflect identities of individuals, as well as the consciousness of masses. Drawing upon varied theoretical foundations of the culture, students will examine the influence of mainstream Hip Hop on racial/ ethnic, gender, and sexual identity development processes across diverse groups of people. The course content draws from research articles, as well as relevant documentaries and movies. Assignments include a research paper, weekly discussions, and exams.

CCJ 6665 | 16084 | Victimology | Cohn
A comprehensive study of victimization, including the relationship between the victims and offenders, and their interaction with the criminal justice system. Considerable amount of time discussing victims of spousal and sexual abuse.

ECP 3254 | 14993 | Women, Men, & Work | Alonso
This course analyzes the performance of women in comparison to men in the U.S. labor market. Using census data, special attention is paid to gender differences in occupations and earnings. The human capital model, labor market discrimination, changing work roles and the family, and government policies affecting paid work and the family are considered.

ECS 3021 | 14558 | Women, Culture & Economic Development | Alonso
This course will use the “capabilities” approach in analyzing the problems of women’s quality of life in developing countries. It is important to recognize that the measurement of output per capita is not the only indicator of the quality of life. The purpose is to identify a number of distinct components of women’s quality of life, including life expentancy, maternal mortality, access to education, access to employment opportunities, and exercise of political rights, and how these indicators are affected by culture. Additional $199 fee for this online course. Please call Economics, 305-348-2318 or 305 348 3281 for permission number.

ENL 5505 | 17717 | Periods in English Literature | Rochelson | Tu 5:00-7:30pm
The literature and criticism regarding one specified period of English Literature, such as Medieval, Renaissance, Victorian, Twentieth Century, and Contemporary. May be repeated with change of period.

REL 3145 | 15430 | Women & Religion | Gudorf
Women and Religion is divided into three parts; the first examines the new archeological findings on neolithic goddess religion, the second examines the roles of women in contemporary religions of the world, and the third surveys ecological activities by women's religious movements

REL 3171 | 15431 | Sex & Religion | Gudorf
A critical examination and attitudes on issues on sexuality within the world’s religions. Special but not exclusive emphasis on western religions.

REL 3520 | 15435 | Saints, Witches & Cathedrals | Gudorf
This course surveys the second millennium of Christian history with a focus on medieval saints and cathedrals, the witchcraft persecutions, and the Reformation. The course pays special attention to the role of gender in medieval theology and hagiography and in Reformation theology, with limited attention to 19th and 20th century Christian theological reassessments of gender.

SOP 3742 | 16158 | Psychology of Women | Stephens
This course offers an overview of psychological theory and research relevant to women in contemporary society. General issues to be considered include the historical treatment of women in psychology, psychoanalytical, socio-biological, social-psychological, and developmental perspectives on the behavior of women and men. In addition, specific topics such as female sexuality, psychopathology, and sex differences in nonverbal behavior will be covered.

SPC 3711 | 10609 | Gender & Communication | Brown
Men and women form vastly different identities and communication styles, even if they are raised in the same homes, educated in the same schools and live in the same country. This is because there are “invisible rules of communication” that are unique to each gender. These “rules” are known to all adult members of that gender, but because men and women behave according to two separate sets of rules about what is appropriate, communication mishaps can occur. This course will look at principal concepts and issues that define the fields of gender and communication. Areas of study include gendered verbal and nonverbal communication, gendered communication in practice including family dynamics, friendship, romance and stereotypes in the workplace.

SYG 4060 | 15159 | Sociology of Sexuality | Lavender
Sociological research will be utilized to compare sexuality for different gender, age, religious, ethnic, and other categories. Topics include marital sexuality, heterosexuality, bisexuality, homosexuality, pornography, prostitution, rape, and incest.