Fall 2011

Fall 2011 List of Approved Courses

*Courses are subject to change based on enrollment

Official Registration Week: July 28 - August 5
Open Registration Week: August 8 - 21
Fall begins: August 22
Fall ends: December 5

MODESTO MAIDIQUE CAMPUS (MMC)

WST 3015 U01-C | 85099 | Intro to Women’s Studies | Jessica Johnson | T Th 7:50-9:05pm
This course is designed to introduce students to women's studies as an interdisciplinary field of knowledge. The purpose of the course is to involve students in the on-going dialogue of women's experiences and women's socialization by sex, class, color, and culture, as well as the economics of discrimination. The course will assist students in clarifying the many misconceptions surrounding the discipline and the myths and realities regarding women's status in society. Topics of discussion include: Connections between women’s studies and feminism; questions of identity and socialization process in determining gender roles; diversity: class, race, ethnicity, age, and sexual orientation; religion and the status of women in societies; our bodies, ourselves; women and work; women and education. Some of the questions addressed in women’s studies include: Why study women? Are women powerless or powerful? Why are racism, heterosexism, ageism, and class exploitation considered to be women’s studies issues? How can feminist thought be used in transformative ways?

WST 3105 U01-C | 88200 | Gender Issues Across the Globe | Moura-Kocoglu | T Th 9:30 - 10:45am
What is a gender issue? Who gets to define what counts as a gender issue—especially across diverse cultures and contexts? This class is an introduction to ‘gender issues’ across the globe, as defined especially by women’s groups, across multiple cultural locations and contexts. The overall aim is to think critically about our own understandings of what these issues are, what kinds of assumptions we might make that shape our understandings, and to hopefully expand those understandings, based on paying attention to and learning from the voices of local groups. In this spirit, we will talk about gender issues that you might expect to talk about, such as violence against women or access to reproductive care. However, we may not always do this in the expected ways. For example, bigger questions here include questions like: How do we define violence against women or reproductive care? What are the parameters of these issues? How do global or transnational forces shape these so-called ‘local’ issues? Beyond these conversations, we will also talk about issues that we may not typically think of as ‘women’s or ‘gender’ issues, such as access to clean water and environmental degradation, food security, war, and economic inequality.

WST 3641 U01-C | 84857 | Gay & Lesbian Across Societies | Valerie Johnsen | T Th 6:25 – 740pm
This course provides an interdisciplinary introduction to gay and lesbian studies by examining the complex issues and debates in American society regarding sexual orientation. An examination of both historical antecedents and the contemporary gay rights movement will include such topics as religion, lifestyles, legal and political issues, and influences on arts and literature.

WST 4252 U01-C | 88151 U01-C | Border Crossings: Race & Gender | Patil | MWF 2:00 - 2:50pm
WST 5253 | 88849 in Historical and Transnational Perspective
SYD 4702 | 88645
SYD 5708 | 88650
IDS 4920 | 88012
This is an advanced-level course intended to help student develop a world-historical perspectives on issues of race and gender in modern society. We will adopt an explicitly historical approach and examine how each category has developed over centuries. Second, a critical component of our studies will be intercultural contact: how has contact between different societies led to power-laden constructions of race and gender? How have the definitions of each relied on the other? What has been the role of these constructions in processes of imperialism and colonialism? What has happened to modern understandings of race and gender with decolonization and the advance of independence movements around the world? What can we say, sociologically, about constructions of race and gender today? In our study, we will look not just to Sociology but also to other disciplines that offer some insight into such questions, including Political Science, History, Anthropology, Postcolonial Studies and Women’s Studies.

WST 4272 U01-C | 88140 | History of Women & Gender in the Middle East | Boutaghou | T Th 6:25 - 7:40pm
Examination questions of feminism in the modern Middle East in relation to religion, law, colonialism, modernity, nationalism, and citizenship.

WST 4905 U01-Z | 85103 | WS Independent Study | Darici | TBA
WST 5905 U01-Z | 85104
Supervised readings course designed for advanced students who wish to pursue specialized topics in women’s studies. Arrangements must be made with faculty member during prior semester. Prerequisite: Permission of Interim Women’s Studies Director, Dr. Yesim Darici. Email: dariciy@fiu.edu for more information.

WST 4940 U01-I | 84610 | Women’s Studies Internship | Jessica Johnson | TBA
WST 5946 U01-I | 84629
This course is available only to students who have taken three Women's Studies courses. Internship sites are arranged on a case by case basis. Students may propose a site or select from sites already established. Most sites are off-campus. See website for guidelines and forms under our “Academics” link: http:/casgroup.fiu.eduwstudies/

APPROVED ELECTIVES

AML 4300 U01-C | 85687 | Major American Writers | Hoder-Salmon | Tu Th 5:00 – 6:15 pm
Each section of this course will consider the works of one, two, or three major American writers. The writers studied in this course will change from semester to semester. May be repeated with change of content. Prerequisites: ENC 1101 and ENC 1102.

AML 4606 U01-C | 87816 | 19th Century African American Literature | Russell | Tu Th 11:00am - 12:15pm
This course examines the genre of the slave narrative and examines testimonies of enslavement, survival and resistance written from the perspectives of New World African enslaved persons. The course foregrounds gender as a category of analysis, and examines the ways in which gender shapes the lives, experiences and perspectives of the enslaved persons whose narratives are examined. Additionally, the course explores recurrent motifs, tropes, and other literary elements that constitute the construction of the slave narrative tradition. Prerequisites of ENC 1101 and ENC 1102.

AMH 3560 B51-C | 86740 – History of Women in the US | Peterson | T Th 12:30 pm - 1:45pm
This course is a survey of the history of women in the United States starting with the colonial period and ending in the present. We will look at women’s everyday experiences as well as movements for women’s rights. This semester we will encounter a variety of women’s voices in documents that require analysis and interpretation. Part of our task will be to develop strategies for interpretation and analysis. Inspiration for using documents as the basis for the course comes from Anna Julia Cooper who said in 1892: “Tis woman’s strongest vindication for speaking that the world needs to hear her voice.”

ANG 6990 U01-C | 88767 | Queer Lives, Queer Theories | Ritchie | W 11:00 am – 1:45 pm

ENL 4212 U01-C | 88784 | Medieval Women Writers | Joan Baker | MWF 12:00 - 12:50pm
The contributions of medieval women to literary history are examined. Among the writers to be studied are Margery Kemp and Marie de France. Prerequisites: ENC 1101 and ENC 1102.

FIL 4881 U01-C | 87049 | Hispanic Culture: Women & Film | Roca | Th 11:00am - 1:45pm
Images and roles of Hispanic women in Latin America, Spain and the United States. Discussion, analysis, and writing. Course aims to enhance students understanding of women in Hispanic culture through films and readings.

GEO 4990 U01-C | 86815 | Geography of Gender | Faria | T Th 2:00-3:15pm
Feminist thought has been incredibly influential in rethinking and troubling taken for granted ideas about how and where ‘politics’ happens. So too has feminist theory provided fresh insight into the workings of global economic processes and complicated our understanding of the social and cultural world. Feminist scholars have pushed us to consider the intricate ways in which identity is marked by difference: class, race, gender, sexuality, disability…and Feminist Geographers have drawn valuable connections between the often ignored spaces and scales of the body, the home, the local and the colonial peripheries, with those of the nation, the state, and the Metropole. In this course we will review and explore the contributions of feminist theorists to the discipline of Geography. We will begin by interrogating what we mean by foundational concepts such as geography, gender, feminism and feminist theory and we will explore some of the open debates around these terms. From there we will read, review, discuss and raise questions around a range of case studies of geography and gender. These will cross the scales of the body, home, nation and international and will include studies of: race and desire in colonial Africa; disappearing female maquiladora workers in Mexico; the troubled historical relationship between feminism and nationalism; the important role of masculinity and femininity during war time; and the politics of gender in migration, citizenship claims and refugee communities.

LBS 4210 RXL-C | 85549 | Women and Work | Addy | DYNAMIC MINI SEMINAR
LBS 5215 RXL-C | 85550 | Women in the Workforce
CLASS MEETS: 9/10 & 24, 10/1 & 23, and 11/5/11. THIS COURSE CARRIES A FLAT FEE LISTED AS LABOR STUDIES. The role of women in the work force and in unions with historical, social, and economic emphasis.

POS 4605 U01-C | 86259 | Gender Justice | Salokar | T Th 2:00 – 3:15pm
The development of gender law in the U.S. and legal strategies by which courts both initiate and respond to demands for social change. Emphasis on various legal definitions of justice and equality.

POT 4309 U01-C | 86261 | Sex, Power & Politics | Stiehm | T Th 7:50 – 905pm
Theories are examined that explain differences between women.

REL 3492 U01-C | 85588 | Earth Ethics | Bauman | T Th 2:00 - 3:15pm
REL 5183 U01-C | 85593 | Religion, Nature & Globalization | Bauman | T Th 2:00-3:15pm & Th 5:00-7:40pm
This course draws from religious, philosophical, and scientific sources in order to examine planetary environmental problems. Environmental Philosophy and Ethics, as well as the emerging field of Religion and Ecology have developed over the past 50-60 years in an attempt to address problematic human-earth relations. However, underlying many of these approaches is a very western understanding of “nature” as pristine, pure and without human presence. The Modern, Western Scientific Worldview, for instance, has attempted to define globally what “nature” is. Historically, some religious worldviews have understood nature as either a pristine creation for which humans ought to be good stewards, or as evil material that must be controlled and eventually escaped. Finally, many Romantic thinkers have argued that culture and technology are the culprits of ecological and social ills, and human beings ought to return to a paradisiacal relationship with nature.

Might these very static notions of nature, as either pristine source of salvation or chaotic source of evil, exacerbate planetary ills? This is precisely what some political, post-modern, and post-colonial scholars have suggested. Nature, from this perspective should be thought of in the plural and not as something separate from “culture.” The very attempt to define nature and globalize that understanding of nature leads to social oppressions (think about what is coded as “natural” or “unnatural”) and ecological ills (through removing humans from their ecological and often urban contexts). This course will explore the effects of globalizing understandings of “nature” and “religion.” The hypothesis of the course is that both religion (culture) and science (nature) have served as apolitical foundations for forcing truth claims upon “others.” In response to this, this course will explore what a “planetary” understanding and ethic (Spivak) of the world as opposed to that of the global might look like. In other words, what might planetary environmental ethics look like?

REL 4382 U01-C | 88783 | Latin Am. Women & Religions in the Americas | Bidegain | Th 5:00pm - 7:40pm
Examines Latinas'participation in the history of religions in the Americas in order to explain the impact of women's religious experiences in cultural, social and political realms.

REL 5386 U01-C | 88845 | Latinas’ Religious Experience | Bidegain | Th 5:00pm - 9:05pm
Focus on the diversity of religious experiences among women born and educated in Latin cultures such as: Brazil, Haiti and Hispanic American, including Hispanic in the U.S.

SYG 4060 U01-C | 86840 | Sociology of Sexuality | Lavender | Tu Th 2:00 - 3:15pm
Sociological research will be utilized to compare sexuality for different gender, age, religious, ethnic, and other categories. Topics include marital sexuality, heterosexuality, bisexuality, homosexuality, pornography, prostitution, rape, and incest.

BISCAYNE BAY CAMPUS (BBC)

WST 3015 B51-C | 88852 | Intro to Women’s Studies | Johnson | MW 5:00 - 6:15pm
This course is designed to introduce students to women's studies as an interdisciplinary field of knowledge. The purpose of the course is to involve students in the on-going dialogue of women's experiences and women's socialization by sex, class, color, and culture, as well as the economics of discrimination. The course will assist students in clarifying the many misconceptions surrounding the discipline and the myths and realities regarding women's status in society. Topics of discussion include: Connections between women’s studies and feminism; questions of identity and socialization process in determining gender roles; diversity: class, race, ethnicity, age, and sexual orientation; religion and the status of women in societies; our bodies, ourselves; women and work; women and education. Some of the questions addressed in women’s studies include: Why study women? Are women powerless or powerful? Why are racism, heterosexism, ageism, and class exploitation considered to be women’s studies issues? How can feminist thought be used in transformative ways?

WST 3641 B51-C | 85105 | Gay and Lesbian Across Societies | Johnson | MW 6:25 - 7:40pm
This course provides an interdisciplinary introduction to gay and lesbian studies by examining the complex issues and debates in American society regarding sexual orientation. An examination of both historical antecedents and the contemporary gay rights movement will include such topics as religion, lifestyles, legal and political issues, and influences on arts and literature.

APPROVED ELECTIVES

AML 4930 B51-O | 87832 | Special Topics: Caribbean Women Poets | Weir | Tu Th 11:00am - 12:15pm
An examination of different aspects of American literature.

AMH 3560 B51-C | 86740 | History of Women in the United States | Peterson | T Th 12:30 – 1:45pm
The changing dimensions of women's lives from the colonial era of U.S. history to the present. The course will examine the changing economic, social, and political position of women as well as the development of feminist movement and organizations.

SOP 3742 B51-C | 84449 | Psychology of Women | Telan | T Th 11:00am – 12:15pm
This course offers an overview of psychological theory and research relevant to women in contemporary society. General issues to be considered include the historical treatment of women in psychology, psychoanalytical, socio-biological, social-psychological, and developmental perspectives on the behavior of women and men. In addition, specific topics such as female sexuality, psychopathology, and sex differences in nonverbal behavior will be covered.

PINES CENTER CAMPUS

LIT 4931 P80-O | 88576 | Special Topics in Women’s Literature | Bentley Baker | Th 6:25 – 9:05pm
IDS 4920 P80-C | 88060
An examination of different aspects of literature by women: The Woman’s Journey. Prerequisites: ENC 1101; ENC 1102. Attendance required the first day of class

REL 3145 P81-C | 89379 | Women & Religion | Rowan | T 6:25 – 9:05pm
Women and Religion is divided into three parts; the first examines the new archeological findings on neolithic goddess religion, the second examines the roles of women in contemporary religions of the world, and the third surveys ecological activities by women's religious movements

SYG 4060 P80-C | 86842 | Sociology of Sexuality | Javadzadeh | Th 6:25 – 9:05pm
Sociological research will be utilized to compare sexuality for different gender, age, religious, ethnic, and other categories. Topics include marital sexuality, heterosexuality, bisexuality, homosexuality, pornography, prostitution, rape, and incest.

ONLINE COURSES

WST 3015 RVC-C | 84718 | Intro to Women’s Studies | Kai
This course is designed to introduce students to women's studies as an interdisciplinary field of knowledge. The purpose of the course is to involve students in the on-going dialogue of women's experiences and women's socialization by sex, class, color, and culture, as well as the economics of discrimination. The course will assist students in clarifying the many misconceptions surrounding the discipline and the myths and realities regarding women's status in society. Topics of discussion include: Connections between women’s studies and feminism; questions of identity and socialization process in determining gender roles; diversity: class, race, ethnicity, age, and sexual orientation; religion and the status of women in societies; our bodies, ourselves; women and work; women and education. Some of the questions addressed in women’s studies include: Why study women? Are women powerless or powerful? Why are racism, heterosexism, ageism, and class exploitation considered to be women’s studies issues? How can feminist thought be used in transformative ways?

WST 3641 RVC-C | 89616 | Gay & Lesbian Across Societies | Eaves
This course provides an interdisciplinary introduction to gay and lesbian studies by examining the complex issues and debates in American society regarding sexual orientation. An examination of both historical antecedents and the contemporary gay rights movement will include such topics as religion, lifestyles, legal and political issues, and influences on arts and literature.

APPROVED ELECTIVES

AML 4624 RVC-C | 87870 | African American Women Writers | Weir
A study of the writings of African American women. May be repeated with change of content.

CCJ 3666 RVC-C | 89568 | Victimology | Cohn
A comprehensive study of victimization, including the relationship between the victims and offenders, and their interaction with the criminal justice system. Considerable amount of time discussing victims of spousal and sexual abuse.

CCJ 4663 RVC-C | 87408 | Women, Crime, & Criminal Justice | Vincent Robinson
Women as deviants, criminals, victims, and professionals in the criminal justice system.

ECP 3254 RVC-C | 84931 | Women, Men, and Work in the USA | Alonso
This course analyzes the performance of women in comparison to men in the U.S. labor market. Using census data, special attention is paid to gender differences in occupations and earnings. The human capital model, labor market discrimination, changing work roles and the family, and government policies affecting paid work and the family are considered.

ECS 3021 RVC-C | 84848 | Women & Economic Development | Alonso
This course will use the “capabilities” approach in analyzing the problems of women’s quality of life in developing countries. It is important to recognize that the measurement of output per capita is not the only indicator of the quality of life. The purpose is to identify a number of distinct components of women’s quality of life, including life expentancy, maternal mortality, access to education, access to employment opportunities, and exercise of political rights, and how these indicators are affected by culture. Additional $199 fee for this online course. Please call Economics, 305-348-2318 or 305 348 3281 for permission number.

MAN 4102 RVC-C | 80772 | Managing Diversity | Kleban
Examines how workforce diversity can lead to competitive advantage and ethical, fair-minded decision making. Includes topics of gender, race, ethnicity, and other areas of diversity. Covers perception and stereotyping, sexual harassment, the “glass ceiling,” and legal issues.

PAD 5435 RVC-C | 86623 | Administration & the Role of Women | Patterson
The course is designed for women and men who are interested in moving into management positions, or who have done so and want to broaden their understanding of the changing role of women. Classes will allow for experimental as well as academic exploration of the issues. The course will also explore design, implementation, and evaluation of affirmative action programs.

REL 3162 RVC-C | 85381 | Healers & Mediums | Pfeiffer
A look into the occult through the eyes of healers and mediums. This course deals with the origination of shamanism and its worldwide patterns. PSI, paranormal psychic phenomena will be addressed from the 20th century spiritualists and their developments that include ESP, psycho kinesis (PK), past-life regressions: reincarnation, near-death-experiences, out-of-body experiences, plant therapy, and animal healing. Hand's on healing with a visit from a spiritual guide and a channeler will be included. Discussions will revolve around today's academic settings where universities and centers are developing to study paranormal phenomena. There is a concentration on women as healers: Eileen Garrett in the US, movements in Latin/South America, and Virginia H. Adair's interviews with 40 women in psychic phenomena.

REL 3171 RVC-C | 85332 | Maarif | Sex and Religion
A critical examination and attitudes on issues on sexuality within the world’s religions. Special but not exclusive emphasis on western religions.

REL 3520 RVC-C | 85397 | Gudorf | Saints, Witches, and Cathedrals
This course surveys the second millennium of Christian history with a focus on medieval saints and cathedrals, the witchcraft persecutions, and the Reformation. The course pays special attention to the role of gender in medieval theology and hagiography and in Reformation theology, with limited attention to 19th and 20th century Christian theological reassessments of gender.

SOP 3742 RVC-C | 84712 | Psychology of Women | Stephens
This course offers an overview of psychological theory and research relevant to women in contemporary society. General issues to be considered include the historical treatment of women in psychology, psychoanalytical, socio-biological, social-psychological, and developmental perspectives on the behavior of women and men. In addition, specific topics such as female sexuality, psychopathology, and sex differences in nonverbal behavior will be covered.

SPC 3711 RVC-C | 80669 | Gender & Communication | Brown
Men and women form vastly different identities and communication styles, even if they are raised in the same homes, educated in the same schools and live in the same country. This is because there are “invisible rules of communication” that are unique to each gender. These “rules” are known to all adult members of that gender, but because men and women behave according to two separate sets of rules about what is appropriate, communication mishaps can occur. This course will look at principal concepts and issues that define the fields of gender and communication. Areas of study include gendered verbal and nonverbal communication, gendered communication in practice including family dynamics, friendship, romance and stereotypes in the workplace.

SYG 4060 RVC-C | 85108 | Sociology of Sexuality | Lavender
Sociological research will be utilized to compare sexuality for different gender, age, religious, ethnic, and other categories. Topics include marital sexuality, heterosexuality, bisexuality, homosexuality, pornography, prostitution, rape, and incest.